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10/18/11

Cocker Spaniel dogs

The Cocker Spaniel is also known as: American Cocker Spaniel

Fast Facts
Group classification: Sporting Country of origin: United States Date of origin: 19th century
Weight (M): 24 - 28 lb Height (M): 14.5 - 15.5" Life expectancy: 12 - 15 years
Weight (F): 24 - 28 lb Height (F): 13.5 - 14.5"











1.General Description of the Cocker Spaniel

The smallest dog in the Sporting Group, the Cocker Spaniel (or American Cocker Spaniel as it is sometimes called) has an efficient and serviceable-looking body, with straight forequarters and a spine that slopes gently to powerful, moderately bent hindquarters, and a docked tail. The Cocker's head is fine and well developed, with a rounded skull and very long, luxuriantly feathered ears, all covered by a posh coat. The Cocker Spaniel's face features noticeable eyebrows and stop, clean cheeks, large nose and a square jaw. The eyes are soft and kind. The Cocker Spaniel's coat can be flat, silky or wavy. The coat is short and fine on the head, medium length with some undercoat along the ribs and back, and long on the rest of the body. The coat can be any solid color, including black, or particolored.

2.Cocker Spaniel Temperament

The Cocker Spaniel has a delightful personality with a mischievous side that reflects a mind of its own. Typically described as jolly, sweet, smart, sociable and eager to please, the Cocker has a spirited curiosity and makes an ideal companion. These dog get along fantastically with strangers, dogs, children and other pets; aggression or timidity is extremely rare. Cocker Spaniels are rather sensitive, so owners need to be gentle and show patience with these dogs. Adaptable to either country or city living, Cockers are a bit demanding of their owner’s time. Owners who are new to the breed will benefit from getting advice from an expert before adopting a Cocker Spaniel. Unlike other spaniels, the Cocker has only a modest instinctual drive to hunt.

3.Caring for a Cocker Spaniel

Cocker Spaniels enjoy being inside the house but they need attention and patience on their owner's part. Their persuasive expression and irresistible desire to snack can easily cause the American Cocker to overindulge. Watch their weight – obesity is not only unhealthy but uncomfortable for your dog. Routine exercise is required to help maintain their overall health and fitness. A romp in the park or game of fetch will satisfy their exercise requirements. In full coat, the American Cocker Spaniel is a pleasure to behold; the long and silky coat requires daily visits from the brush and comb. At the very least a once a week thorough combing is necessary, taking care around the ear canal to keep this area free of hair and to provide exposure to air. Avoid pulling out the long silky coat-hairs when brushing. Habitual appointments with a groomer will help maintain their general well-kept appearance. Often owners will clip their Cocker Spaniel, especially in the early summer, to make the dog feel cooler and to allow for easier swimming. American Cocker Spaniels are average shedders. Known health issues in the Cocker Spaniel include progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma, patellar luxation and cataracts. Sometimes, one will also see canine hip dysplasia, ectropion, entropion, allergies, otitis externa, kidney stones and liver disease.
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