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Showing posts with label Dogs question. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dogs question. Show all posts

2/8/14

All Questions you shoud read when resolve foster A Dog

Fostering pets has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life and is something I encourage everyone I know to do. But I’ve learned some big lessons along the way.

For the experience to turn out well for the foster parent and the rescue organization (and, most of all, the dog), it’s crucial that all parties communicate and be clear about their expectations and responsibilities.

2/7/14

What are The Best Dog Breed for Children and Families

The kids have been begging for a puppy for years. You've been able to put them off with some fish, maybe a hamster, or even a cat. But this time, only something from the canine family will do.

Although many people are happy getting a mixed breed puppy, others like to know a little more about what that cute little ball of fur will look like in a year. If that’s the case, then you need to look at purebred dogs. But how do you find the best one for your family? Gina DiNardo, assistant vice president of the American Kennel Club and second-generation dog fancier, answers the most commonly asked questions about breeds.

The way to Help Your Dog With Separation Anxiety and Other Common Fears

You've heard the stories: a dog is so terrified during a thunderstorm that he jumps through a picture window to escape. Or maybe your dog is the one that ate the living room couch while you were out.

We asked Victoria Stilwell, the internationally known author, dog trainer, and star of Animal Planet’s "It’s Me or The Dog," why dogs do these things.

1/19/13

Why is my dog always scratching?

First of all you have to determine why your dog is scratching at his ears and feet, so I would recommend that you take your dog along to the vets.

It is important to identify the cause of the dermatitis, if that is the problem, and to eliminate it from your dog's life.

Skin irritation can be due to an allergic reaction. For example, a dog may react to something in the environment, such as house dust, house dust mites, fungi and pollens.


Dog Grooming/my dog smells no matter what i do

Question
I have a female white pit bull. She is my baby, well cared for. Lives in the house. I bathe her with the best doggie shampoos, she does not have fleas (frontline). The thing is, she stinks. When I come in the house, there is this stench on her, like an old sock or something. I keep her bedding clean, spray her with all kinds of stuff like "Stinky Dog Gone," doggie perfumes, still she stinks. It is like her body chemistry or something. Not her breath, like her body in general. Is there some medical condition I dont know about that causes this? It is causing a real problem with me and my husband because he constantly complains about her smell. She is only 3 yrs old and is otherwise a perfect dog. Oh, and when she goes outside to bathroom and then comes back in or if she has excercised, she really stinks for a while. Like a sweaty person, only i know dogs dont sweat. Any imput you could give me would be appreciated. Thanks.....Oh, my husband said he could tell she was going to stink as a puppy cause she didnt have a pleasant odor (like cute puppy breath) when she was young. She wasnt bad, just not normal. I dont know how true this is, but that is what he says. I know some people have like a bad body chemistry, you know, not that they are not clean, you just dont like the way they smell. OK im not crazy, just give me something. 

Answer
From what you describe to me it sounds as if you might be correct in that it is her natural skin oils releasing this odor. 
Have you taken her to the vet for this problem? I am not a vet, but there is a possibility that she has a 
bacterial infection in her skin. Or even a parasite. 
I use a homeopathic recipe for dogs with a strong odor or who have been sprayed by a skunk. It works great and it
does help to eliminate the smell.
Mix together 16 oz. of peroxide , 1/4 c. of baking soda
and 3 tsp. blue dawn dish soap in a 32 oz. jug .Add 1/4 c. of the strongest smelling shampoo you have on hand to aid in forming the lather. After putting these things in the jug, fill the jug up with water . Use this mixture to give
the dog a bath . Work up a good lather and let sit on the
dog for about 3-5 min. If the dog starts getting restless
just start working the shampoo agian. Rinse the dog well.
If you don't it leaves a residue which will dry out the skin
and cause her to itch.
Once you've rinsed her off give her a second bath with
children's baby shampoo. 
If this doesn't seem to do the trick then talk to your
vet about the possiblity of bacterial infection or parasites. 
I hope that I have been of some help. If you need to 
feel free to contact me agian. Goodluck and God Bless

1/13/13

Can a dog be in front when doing something...

Can a dog be in front when doing something such as rollerblading, pulling a sled or cart and still consider the handler the pack leader?
Answer:
Yes, if you present it as a job, a dog can learn that tasks such as cart- and sled-pulling and even rollerblading means it is time to work. There are no happier dogs than those that are given jobs. Most breeds were originally bred as working dogs and they still love having a task to this day. When rollerblading, it is best if the handler can get the dog to run beside them. 


During specific times the handler can allow the dog to pull them, for example, up a hill. However the handler must be able to get the dog to fall back beside them on command. It is important that the handler is in complete control. The human needs to show the dog leadership before, during, and after the signal is given to pull, showing an air of authority. The dog will see it as a job. When they are finished the task the dog needs to go right back into the heeling mode and the handler should enter any yards and or gates before them.

the best way to help my dog overcome his fears

Question: My dog is skittish and afraid of a lot of things. What is the best way for me to help him overcome his fears?

Answer:
The best thing you can do to help a dog overcome its fears is to teach it to pack-walk. Walk him every day and ask him to heel and respect those around him. Showing a dog leadership will help him feel secure. Dogs really want to know what to expect, who is in charge and what the rules are. 


Giving a dog that type of structure is the best way to help him overcome a lot of unnatural issues. Do not feel sorry for the dog or he will sense your feelings and it will make him unsure. The humans around the dog need to be strong-minded so the dog can relax and not worry about who is going to lead. Learn how to speak dog so your dog understands you and you understand your dog.

how do I single out a specific dog?

I have more than one dog. Since it is not good to use a dog's name when correcting it how do I single out a specific dog?

Answer:
The reason you do not want to use the dog’s name when correcting him is because it is not good to associate a dog’s name with anything negative. A name should only be associated with positive things. When communicating with a specific dog you want to use body language towards the dog you are correcting. Think of yourself standing around a bunch of humans.


 There are ways to let a person know that you are referring to them without saying their name; the same holds true for dogs. Some of these ways include making eye contact, walking towards them, leaning towards them or pointing at them. Another method that some like to use is to give each dog a second name or pick a sound that you only use when that particular dog is being corrected. The name or sound should not sound like their real names yet they should associate it with themselves. Other humans and yourself should not use their “correction names” when you are calling them to come to you, asking them to perform a behavior, etc.

the difference between "training" and being a pack leader to achieve a healthy stability in a dog

Question: What is the difference between "training" and being a pack leader to achieve a healthy stability in a dog?

Answer:A dog can be trained to perfectly sit, stay, come, give its paw, dance, roll over and even more complicated tricks such as close the refrigerator and fetch the newspaper, yet still be unbalanced and dominant. When a dog learns a "trick" she often remembers it for life. 



Whereas, maintaining a healthy relationship with your dog where she is stable-minded, knows her place in the pack and is relaxed, happy and comfortable with life takes a certain type of lifestyle and commitment 24 hours a day / 7 days a week. Often, people will be having behavioral issues with their dog and hire a "trainer" when what they really need to be doing is hiring a "behaviorist." Training is teaching behaviors, the other is asking for a level of respect and satisfying the natural instincts of the animal within the dog. For more info, read infor behind:

Establish as pack leader with dog

Question: Once I establish myself as pack leader with my dog does this position stick for life, or is it something I have to maintain?

Answer:
Showing a dog leadership is a lifetime commitment, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It is not training, it's a lifestyle when living with a dog. You can lose your position at any time, at any age. A dog is constantly looking for the strongest being in the home to be leader. 



Instinct tells him that the packs life depends on it. In the wild when a pack leader gets old or sick another dog will take over as leader. This can happen at any time, at any age. The strongest beings are the leaders. That being said, if you have lost your leadership position or never had it in the first position, you can gain it back if you change your ways.

Can I get a high-energy breed

Question: I am not a very active person. Can I still get a high-energy breed if I choose a puppy that is not as active as the other littermates?

Answer:

When choosing a dog, picking a dog with an energy level that matches or is lower than your own is one of the most important factors to consider. If you choose a dog that is more active than yourself or your family, you will always struggle to provide what the dog needs to keep it stable-minded. If you do not consider yourself an energetic person it is not wise to get a breed that is considered high-energy. In a high-energy breed even the lower energy puppies within a litter will be energetic, just a little less, but still high.


Think of it this way, hypothetically. Let’s assume you have the energy level of the average person. Now think of a number scale from one to ten.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

We will call the average person’s energy a 6 on the scale.

A low-energy dog can range from 1 to 3 on the scale.

A medium-energy dog can range from 4 to 7 on the scale.

A high-energy dog can range from 8 to 10 on the energy scale.

Therefore, if you choose a high-energy breed that is one of the less energetic in the litter, the dog may be an 8, however you will still be a 6.

How much affection should I give and how much should I play with my dog

Question: I just rescued a dog. How much affection should I give and how much should I play with it?
Answer:

If you have adopted an adult rescue dog it is recommended that you refrain from lots of play and affection until the dog gets to know you and understands her place in the pack. 


After you have had the dog for a day or more and you see the dog is well-adjusted and understands the order, during the times the dog is acting calm and submissive you can love on her all you want. You can also play with her all you want when she is submissive. It is just important that you as the human are the one who starts and ends the play. The more the dog is submissive, the more you can play with and love on her.

How do I balance this to keep the dog as a guard dog?

Question: If I am 100% pack leader will my dog still act as a guard dog if it is ever necessary? How do I balance this to keep the dog as a guard dog? I wouldn't want a person to get a free pass that broke in to my home.
Answer:
You can never take the guard out of a guard dog. no matter how submissive that dog is. If there is a threat all members of the pack defend. Also, since dogs can read the moods of other beings the dog will know if someone has bad intentions. 


A dog will not ignore that if they think you are in danger. The other point is, if you know for a fact that your dog is perfectly balanced and he starts acting out of the ordinary, that is, when you will know for sure that he senses something that is not quite right. As submissive as my Boxer Bruno is, he still will bark at the door if he sees someone coming down the driveway. 

I could possibly teach him not to bark, but I can never take the guard out of him because it is an instinct.

What is the best way to introduce one dog to another

Question : What is the best way to introduce one dog to another?
Answer:

The best way to introduce one dog to another is to pack-walk both dogs. Meaning, both dogs are walking together and heeling on the lead. This sends a signal to the dogs that they are not in charge; the humans are in charge and they are to follow the humans. I realize you cannot pack-walk your dog with all dogs you come into contact with, but consistently pack-walking your own dog will communicate to your dog that he is following you and looking to you for commands rather than the other way around. 


You should be going through all doorways and gateways before your dog as well, especially at the vet, and the dog should be heeling beside you while you walk him over to your seat. As soon as your dog begins to see you as someone to follow, he will respond to your corrections much quicker when you tell him to leave the other dog alone by giving him a tug on his lead and/or a verbal command.

Is it possible to get my own dog and raise my friend to be balanced even though the other 2 dogs in the home are not

Question: I live with someone who is not pack leader to his two current dogs. Is it possible for me to get my own dog and raise him to be balanced even though the other two dogs in the home are not?

Since they're his dogs I don't want to interfere with his methods, although I consider them wrong. My problem is that I want to get a dog of my own, but to show him that I'm the pack leader. I'm worried that it would be too confusing for my (the youngest) dog if older dogs are allowed on the couch/bed and he isn't, older dogs can pull the leash while on the walk, while he needs to walk beside or behind me, other two can go through the door and get attention first while he needs to wait to go through or get petted.

Answer:
In order for a dog to totally respect and obey humans, the humans around her need to be consistent. If you bring a dog into a home where one person does not display leadership you are not going to accomplish that leadership with the third dog. Especially if there are two other dogs in the home that are allowed to act in dominant or disrespectful manners. When humans and dogs live together they become one pack. If half the pack is not balanced the rest of the pack cannot be balanced.

1/12/13

I was told by a behavior specialist not to play tug-of-war with my dog. Why?

Question: I was told by a behavior specialist not to play tug-of-war with my dog. Why?
Answer:
Tug-of-war is not a recommended game for dogs because it is a dominance game. If your dog should win you just reinforced in your dog’s mind that he is in the leader position. It puts him in a dominance struggle state of mind. You want to get him out of thinking about being the leader, not play dominance games with him. When he is pulling he is fighting for the leader spot, while for you it is just a game.



 Sure, if you win, then you win, but if you accidentally let go then he wins and winning to him means something different than winning to you. Another important factor when playing with a dog is that you should only play with him when YOU bring HIM the toy; you TELL HIM when and where. You should be the one to end the game, not him. So if you see him getting tired then you must end the game before he does. Otherwise you let him make the decision and in the canine world the leaders make all the decisions.

Question: Why does my dog get mad and destroy things when I leave the house?

Question: Why does my dog get mad and destroy things when I leave the house?


Answer:


Sounds like a case of separation anxiety. Your dog is not getting mad when you leave. He is stressed either from a lack of exercise, a lack of leadership, or both. Followers are not allowed to leave the leaders and he did not give you permission to leave. Dominant behaviors always get worse over time if nothing is done to communicate to the dog that he is not the leader or he does not have an outlet to release his built-up energy. 


Read more about separation anxiety behind :

Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Your dog may look happy when you return, but in truth if your dog is excitable, he may be experiencing mental anguish, which is not healthy.

Did you know that separation anxiety is the second most common reason dogs are euthanized or given up by their owners?

Separation anxiety can occur in any breed and at any age.

Why has my housebroken, full-grown dog started peeing in my bed?

 Question: Why has my housebroken, full-grown dog started peeing in my bed?
Answer:


Assuming you have ruled out any health issues such as incontinence, this behavior would indicate that your dog is letting you know he is alpha in your pack. He is above you in the order and is marking on "his" bed. I would start looking into human-to-dog leadership and the amount and type of exercise he receives.


If one really understands dogs and how to communicate leadership to them one can get away with having a dog sleep on their bed with them. However, in most cases, I personally do not believe dogs belong on beds because in the dog world the leader sleeps in the most comfortable spot in the house. By letting a dog sleep on your bed most people unknowingly are allowing them to take the bed over. A follower would NEVER dream of purposely peeing in the place where the leader sleeps. Never...it just would not happen. If a dog is going to be on a human's bed it needs to be invited up onto the bed by the human and not jump up at its own free will.

What are the signs of a happy, stable-minded, submissive dog

Question: What are the signs of a happy, stable-minded, submissive dog? I walk my dog daily and am the pack leader. My dog is so calm I sometimes think he looks depressed.

Answer:

The sign of a happy, stable-minded, submissive dog is a dog that is not overly excited and that holds his tail low and is calm. It is not normal, nor is it healthy, for a dog to be so extremely excited that his tail is wagging a mile a minute and he cannot stand still. A dog that excited is anxiety ridden with excess energy. Your dog is not sad or depressed. 


Dogs are not like humans. They think differently because they are different. A wagging tail is not necessarily a sign of happiness. Dogs that are upset and stressed will also wag their tails. The dogs you see jumping around like crazy, running and unable to stand still are dogs that are not stable. Do not mistake this behavior as being sad or depressed and feel bad for him, or you will confuse your dog by giving off weak energy.

How do I get my rescue dog to trust me?

Question: How do I get my rescue dog to trust me?
She was found homeless and we were able to catch her using a tranquilizer. She has never growled, just runs away and won't let me pet her. She is currently in my fenced backyard. My other dogs really like her, however, and they get along great. She just will not let us humans approach her.

Answer:
She sounds insecure and not sure what to think of the humans. One rule of natural dog behavior is you cannot rush and force yourself upon insecure dogs. You are going to have to take it slow and not approach her head-on until she learns to trust you. Here is something you can do: Sit down in your backyard where the dog is. Place a bowl of tasty food a few feet from where you are sitting and read a book (or something). Do not make eye contact with the dog and don't talk to her. Just sit there quietly. Let her get used to you simply being there. Each feeding, move the bowl a little closer to where you are sitting. You can also sit down and toss something like tasty bacon her way. Remember, don't look directly at or talk to her. Just sit calmly and quietly.

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